About Photography…

This is somewhere to post my random thoughts on photography…

6 Responses to “About Photography…”

  1. admin Says:

    Time passes on, the seasons change…
    Photography is a seasonal occupation. Some types of photography can be done at any time of the year, but other techniques lens themselves to specific seasons. I tend to think of spring as the “infra red” season as it’s the time of year when new leaves reflect a lot of infra red light, showing as white foliage when shooting traditional monochrome infra red, film, or digital. Although I still have the equipment to do “wet film” infra red, I’m probably too lazy, and so my infra red work has been digital for some years. I have an IR converted Canon, but I get just as good results with my Fujis and a Hoya 720IR filter, and the resulting slow shutter speeds help emulate the “look” of traditional IR film.
    Spring is also the pinhole season, as you need a reasonable amount of light. Pinhole digital photography is an excellent way of finding every speck of dust on your sensor, and overall, I don’t feel it works as well as it does on film, though it will be camera dependent. Cameras with a short “flange focal distance” – i.e. the distance between lens mount and sensor is quite shallow – Leica, Fuji, Sony and most Micro 4:3 bodies, will give a wider angle of view than SLR type bodies, but will also emphasise an inherent problem with digital pinhole photography. Digital sensors don’t work well when light lands on them obliquely and you get both exposure errors and colour shifts, so a typical digital pinhole image will have a bright centre and darker edges, with a distinct colour shift. Conversion to black and white will get rid of the colour anomalies, and the exposure shift across the frame can look quite attractive, or could be fixed via software if you don’t like the vignette effect. I’ll still keep taking pinhole images, for fun, but a large format film camera will do a much better job.

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